Love Letter: Breaking the Cycle of Abandonment | #facebookdating | #tinder | #pof

By the age of 3, Kacey Vu Shap had experienced unthinkable loss, and in the next two years he would experience so much more. His mother and his younger brother died when he was 2, leaving his maternal grandmother to be his only caregiver. When he was 5, his older sister drowned in a river near their home in Vietnam, and he then learned that his father had died, too. That same year, his grandmother asked him to pack for a trip, which he would later find out was to an orphanage, where he would stay for two years before being adopted by a family in America.

Nearly 25 years later, Mr. Shap returned to Vietnam with friends from college who had talked him into returning to the orphanage. He found himself flooded with the feelings of abandonment he had tried hard to leave there.

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The way we meet and interact with others has changed drastically since the coronavirus outbreak. For many singles, social distancing (and the fear of contracting a highly contagious virus) has put a pause on dating. Despite the many difficulties that meeting someone new during a pandemic presents, it’s still doable if you’re willing to be direct about your needs and comfort level. Here are some tips on how to jump-start your dating life, safely.

And while the first year of marriage is often considered to be a difficult period of transition for some couples, many young newlyweds find that blending their lives before marriage has made for a much smoother entrance into matrimony.

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