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The coronavirus has been making or breaking relationships: College students are left wondering if now is the time to be single or to mingle.

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?Yilong Zhang?/THE REVIEW
The coronavirus has been making or breaking relationships: College students are left wondering if now is the time to be single or to mingle.

BY , ?Contributing Reporter?
AND , Contributing Reporter

The coronavirus has been making or breaking relationships: College students are left wondering if now is the time to be single or to mingle.

Quarantining has made it harder for some couples to see each other. Jessica Selle, a 2020 university alumnus currently working as an accounting consultant, said it is difficult to schedule meeting time with her boyfriend of three and a half years.

“We were supposed to visit each other one week last month, and then one of us ended up having a COVID scare,” Selle said. “So, we almost had to cancel the trip because of that.”

However, some couples have found more opportunity to see each other now than ever before.

Olivia Sylvester, a junior environmental engineering major, said she sees her boyfriend of 17 months more than usual, considering he does not go to the university.

“His classes are all online, so he has visited a lot more,” Sylvester said.

Sydney Kappers, a junior health behavior science major, has experienced the same benefit of dating during COVID-19.

“It gave us more of an opportunity to hang out when we’re both doing nothing in quarantine,” Kappers said.

While COVID-19 gives those who are already in relationships more time to see one another, it makes it difficult for single people to meet new people in person.

Alana Garcia, a senior psychology major at Hunter College in New York City, talked about how the pandemic has changed the way she pursues dating.

“COVID has made me rely more on apps than I wish,” Garcia said. “I like to meet people in person randomly at a bar, or something of that nature. I think it makes it less organic, and therefore, there’s more pressure.”

Olivia Fontana, a senior cognitive science major, explained that she has also taken to dating apps. However, the fear of contracting the virus prevents her from meeting people in person.

“I used dating apps mostly out of boredom,” Fontana said. “When I got down to it, I never really met anyone.”

Fears of online dating extend beyond health concerns. Garcia said that she is afraid that talking to someone on a dating app makes it more difficult to find a real connection.

“If we really get along well, I’ll give him my number,” Garcia said. “If we keep hitting it off, I’ll ask to FaceTime, and only after that will I go on a date with him out of precaution for myself and to make sure that he and I are compatible.”

Kappers also warned students to be selective about dating during this time.

“Be careful with who you’re going on a date with,” Kappers said. “If you’re really interested in someone, obviously go on a date, but I wouldn’t say go out searching frantically for your soulmate right now. Do more outdoorsy things like picnics, etc.”

Selle admitted that she considers people to be lonely by nature and need to connect with others. However, lack of respect for the virus has become a dealbreaker in the dating world.

“My friend met a guy online that she thought was really cool, but then when she went on a date with him: he wasn’t wearing a mask,” Selle said. “He was just like, ‘What’s the big deal,’ so she didn’t go out with him again because of that.”

Sylvester also stressed the importance of being careful and physically healthy being in a relationship at this time.

“It’s safe as long as [the couple] is on the same page and getting tested, quarantining before seeing each other,” Sylvester said.


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