original_title] | #bumble | #tinder | #pof


_________________________


For most of us, dating revolves around dining – so what do we do when we can’t just pick a romantic restaurant and show up?

We get creative , that’s what. Restaurants and bars may be shuttered during Singapore’s Phase 2 (Heightened Alert), but that doesn’t mean you need to press pause on your dating life . Whether you’re taking the next step with your Bumble match or shaking up your regular routine with your partner, here’re all the fun activities for two to do.

Explore under-the-radar museums

Had one too many tours of Singapore’s national galleries? Take a detour at some of our smaller but no less intriguing private museums. Nothing spells romance like a date with sparkly gemstones, and The Gem Museum is a goldmine. Get dazzled by everything from raw ruby specimens to birthstones in rainbow hues, and don’t forget to check out the rock garden.

For an auditory feast, the Singapore Musical Box Museum is home to dozens of century-old antique boxes from Europe, each intricately crafted and tinkling with classical music. Meanwhile, The Intan is a trove of exquisite Peranakan artifacts from furnishings to beaded slippers, all collected over decades by owner Alvin Yapp.

Get crafty

We’re all suckers for lovingly handmade gifts, and making them together just ups the fun factor. Add some sparkle to your relationship by handcrafting your own bespoke silver jewellery at Fat Anvil Studio – this silversmithing studio offers private workshops for two.

Or make your date sweeter with a baking sesh at Nanatang – this popular studio runs classes on everything from cute character donuts to choux pastries, currently capped at four pax. Plant lovers can head over to The Green Capsule to build your own picturesque terrariums – green thumbs not necessary. For more crafty ideas, check out our guide to lifestyle workshops in Singapore.

ALSO READ: 10 fun date ideas if you want to stay indoors amid Covid-19 outbreak

Sweat it out together

Most studios are shut for the moment, but outdoor fitness classes are still ongoing – complete with fresh air and date-worthy scenery. True Fitness sister brand GFX has a slew of workouts from sunrise yoga to mixed martial arts to get your endorphins rushing – their Harbourfront branch is prime for catching the sunset.

Spin studio Aurora is taking the joyride outdoors at its breezy South Beach location, while UFIT‘s high-energy bootcamps take place in lush locales including East Coast Park, Fort Canning Park, and the Botanic Gardens. Hit up our roundup of outdoor fitness classes in Singapore for more options.

Hop on a bike

There’s no question that Singapore’s sights are best seen on two wheels, with a breeze in your hair and lush scenery whizzing past. If a leisurely chat with your date is what you’re after, opt for the freshly launched Changi Airport Connector – a 3.5km stretch lined with life-sized dinosaurs.

Meanwhile, the 16km Khatib Loop is a picturesque ride down memory lane, passing through black-and-white colonial bungalows, a bunker, and Sembawang Hot Spring Park. For adventurous couples, test your mettle on the ultimate Coast-to-Coast Trail.

ALSO READ: Love in the time of coronavirus: 6 activities for your date nights at home

Spanning 18 parks and 36km, this trail snakes from Jurong Lake Gardens in the far west to Coney Island in the northeast. Check out our guide to Singapore’s scenic cycling trails to get rolling.

Take a street art stroll

Once you’ve explored your fill of Singapore’s museums, there’s plenty of art to be found on a romantic stroll outdoors too. The latest splash of colour to hit our streets is over at Kampong Gelam, courtesy of the Singapore Tourism Board. Dubbed the Hall of Fame, this sprawling street art experience features vibrant murals from 17 artists along Bali Lane and Ophir Road.

Another hotspot for mural hopping is Katong – this heritage ‘hood hides stunning gems like Medley Alley, a pair of butterfly wings assembled from colourful Peranakan tiles, and A History of Healing, a moving ode to a former maternal health clinic.

Make a splash

With Singapore’s temperature rarely dipping below 30°C this month, we’re seriously in need of a cool dip.

Public swimming spots still open to groups of two include Wild Wild Wet – this waterpark paradise packs in the thrills with near-vertical plunges, racer slides, and extreme loops. If a languid soak together is more your mood, cool off in Tampines Swimming Complex‘s rooftop Jacuzzi pool; for Westies, Jurong East Swimming Complex can give waterparks a run for their money with a lazy river, a wave pool, a Jacuzzi, and three water slides to plunge into.

ALSO READ: Best date ideas in Singapore: Unique and creative ways to romance your partner with a night out

Take it virtual

alt

If you’re all about staying home and staying safe, that doesn’t mean you need to dial down your dating life. Last circuit breaker, we came up with a handful of tried-and-tested virtual date ideas to keep the spark going from afar. Some of our favourites so far?

Playing Masterchef with a cooking sesh over Zoom, working on your bucket list with a virtual vacay , as well as wacky trivia games on Houseparty. If you want to glam it up, send each other a fine-dining delivery feast and savour it together over Zoom. Some candlelight and smooth jazz will set the mood nicely.

Escape to a tranquil beach

Skip the crowded sands of Sentosa or East Coast Park – Singapore still has well-kept beach secrets tucked away for a laidback escape for two. Perched at the very end of Punggol Point Park, Punggol Beach offers serene golden sands for soaking up Vitamin D in tranquility.

Another northside beach that never gets too packed is Sembawang Park, a seaside park set far from the urban bustle beside Sembawang Shipyard. If you’re itching for a far-flung getaway (well, as far as we can get without travelling), hop aboard a ferry to Lazarus Island – St John Island’s lesser-known little sister with its fine white sands and pristine waters.

ALSO READ: 35 fun date ideas for couples without spending too much

This article was first published in City Nomads.





Source link
.  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .  .   .   .   .  .  .   .  .


_________________________