#sextrafficking | These Beauty Brands Are Speaking Up And Taking Action To Support Black Lives | #tinder | #pof | #match

As protests and demonstrations continue to unfold in response to the death of George Floyd and demand an end to police brutality against Black Americans, members of the beauty community have voiced their support for the cause and are pledging the money to back it up.

Glossier

Millennial-favorite Glossier took to Instagram on Saturday to share its commitment to the Black community. “We stand in solidarity with the fight against systemic racism, white supremacy, and the historic oppression of the Black community. Black Lives Matter,” the brand wrote. “We will be donating $500K across organizations focused on combating racial injustice: Black Lives Matter, The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, The Equal Justice Initiative, The Marsha P. Johnson Institute, and We The Protesters.” Glossier also stated that it will be allocating a further $500,000 in grants to Black-owned beauty businesses with more details to come in the coming weeks. “We’re inspired by so many people in our community who are using their voices and making change. We see you and are with you,” the post finished. “For those looking for ways to take action, you can find resources for engagement and education in our Stories.”

Sunday Riley

Like George Floyd, Sunday Riley, the woman behind the beloved eponymous skincare brand, is from Houston, and the two even attended the same high school, though years apart. “We weren’t the same age, we weren’t in the same year. But we walked the same hallways, maybe sat in the same classrooms, albeit at different moments in time,” the brand’s founder wrote on Instagram. “We had entirely different lives, different opportunities, and faced different challenges. Had we both been in the exact same situation, at the exact same moment, I think it would have ended differently for me. Actually I know it would have.” She shared that it was therefore especially important to her and her team that Sunday Riley support the Black community locally, but in recognition of the discrimination and hatred found all across the U.S., the brand said it made a $50,000 donation commitment to the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund on Saturday. “We are limited in our resources, but not in our voice,” Riley wrote.

Kosas

Alongside a black-and-white photo of an L.A. protest, cult brand Kosas shared its support for the Black community via Instagram on Sunday. “We will not be silent. We stand in solidarity with all those fighting against social injustice,” the post said. “Kosas will be pledging $20k to organizations who are actively fighting to make real change: Black Lives Matter, Black Lives Matter LA, and Color of Change.” The brand also urged its more-than-149,000 followers to do their part by donating to various organizations, contacting their congressional representatives, and signing petitions seeking justice for George Floyd, Tony McDade, and Breonna Taylor, all of whom were killed at the hands of police.

Peach & Lily

The K-Beauty favorite similarly took to Instagram on Saturday to show its allegiance with Black America. “Peach & Lily celebrates ALL people. We believe in integrating with our community to make a positive difference together,” founder Alicia Yoon wrote. “Some might wonder, ‘why should a beauty brand speak up about social issues?’ To us, a business is not distinct from society.” Peach & Lily noted that for the past five years, it’s partnered with Restore NYC, an organization that supports survivors of sex trafficking and said that its team can’t help but notice the racism, injustice, and cruelty that plague the United States. “In the words of Martin Luther King Jr., “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. “In the words of Martin Luther King Jr., ‘injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,’ the post continued before sharing that Peach & Lily will donate an undisclosed amount to the ACLU. “Peach & Lily is a safe space for EVERYONE—regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or age. As a business, and as individuals, we are speaking up and standing up for what’s right. We encourage you to do the same. WE STAND WITH YOU.”

Herbivore Botanicals

Vegan skincare and wellness company Herbivore Botanicals shared on Saturday that 100% of its profits from the weekend would be donated to the ACLA, Black Lives Matter, and the Minnesota Freedom Fund. “This must stop,” the brand wrote on Instagram. “We stand in solidarity with everyone protesting this weekend.”

NYX Professional Makeup

L.A.-based beauty brand NYX informed its 14.6 million Instagram followers on Friday that it would be donating to the cause. Alongside a powerfully simple graphic that read, “IT’S NOT OK,” the makeup giant wrote, “…and we’re not okay. We stand with our black community and will be donating to the Minnesota Freedom Funs and Black Lives Matter.”

Cocokind

Clean skincare brand Cocokind voiced its support in not one but two Instagram posts over the weekend. “We are appalled to constantly hear stories of the pervasive, violent racism that plagues America,” the first read. “Our voices and actions matter, today, and every day.” Cocokind said it believes businesses have a responsibility to make an impact and would be donating $10,000 to the ACLU accordingly. “This is what really matters in the world right now. Now is the time to speak up and act,” Friday’s post concluded. The next day, the brand returned to Instagram to share a list of black-owned beauty businesses, asking its followers to “show up for, support, and provide the OPPORTUNITY to succeed.”

Maybelline

Drugstore beauty giant Maybelline took to Instagram on Saturday to share how it would be helping the cause. Alongside a heart made of different skin tones—and foundation shades—the brand wrote, “At Maybelline we believe in inclusivity, equality and justice for all.” It said that because of it, it would be donating to the NAACP, noting, “together we can make change happen.”

Glow Recipe

“Our hearts have been hurting as we’ve watched injustice continually unfold over the past few days,” Glow Recipe wrote in an Instagram post on Saturday. “We’ve been thinking of ways to help and are happy to support Black Visions Collective, a Black, Trans, and Queer led organization dedicated to Black liberation that are doing incredible work to help support Minnesota during this time, with a $10k donation.” The brand encouraged its followers to do their part, starting by recognizing and acknowledging their privilege and educating themselves and shared a list of organizations they could donate to. “It’s up to all of us to make a change,” Glow Recipe said.

e.l.f Cosmetics

Makeup giant e.l.f Cosmetics shared a series of photos via Instagram on Sunday and pledged its support alongside a number of other beauty brands. “We Stand United with our Fellow Beauty Community and Support their Actions alongside ours,” the brand wrote. e.l.f then shared that it will donate $25,000 to Color of Change to support the organization’s efforts in fighting injustice and making America a safer place for Black people.

Urban Decay Cosmetics

Urban Decay also voiced its support via Instagram with a post on Saturday that read, “Silence is not an option. Speak up.” The brand pledged to donate an undisclosed amount to Minnesota Freedom Fund and Black Lives Matter, writing, “To all our black colleagues, friends, and community—we stand with you.”

ColourPop Cosmetics

L.A. brand ColourPop took to Instagram on Saturday with a colorful post supporting the Black community. “We hear you, and we support you,” the brand shared with its 9.5 million followers and said it would make a donation to the Minnesota Freedom Fund and the ACLU.

Many other beauty brands, including Fenty Beauty, Becca Cosmetics, Clinique, Drunk Elephant, and The Ouai, voiced their support for the Black community over the weekend, with some noting a monetary donation would be announced soon.


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