Should a man earn more than a woman? Singles weigh in on the controversial modern dating topic | #facebookdating | #tinder | #pof

Would you date a man who earned less than you? Singles weigh in on the controversial topic – with some saying it SHOULDN’T be equal

  • Australian relationship expert Louanne Ward has posed a question on Facebook
  • She asked singles whether it was still important for a man to earn more today
  • Some said it helps if a man earns more because he won’t feel emasculated 
  • While others said it shouldn’t matter so long as the household bills are being paid
  • More than one million Australians have lost their jobs during COVID-19 

Poll

Is it important for a man to earn more than a woman in a relationship?

  • Yes, I think so 31 votes
  • No, it doesn’t matter 71 votes

An Australian relationship coach has asked female singles whether they’d date a man earning less than them – with conflicting results.

Expert Louanne Ward, from Perth in Western Australia, posed the question in her Facebook group She Said, He Said, looking to see whether modern relationships saw men and women treated evenly, or whether it was still expected for the male to ‘bring home the bacon’.

Some people said that it’s important for a man to feel like he is providing for his partner and family, so as not to be ’emasculated’, whereas others said it would only matter if you’re an ‘insecure moron’, and most men would be happy to see their partner earning more.

Expert Louanne Ward posed the question in her Facebook group She Said, He Said, looking to see whether modern relationships treated men and women evenly, or whether it was still expected for the male to ‘bring home the bacon’ 

‘All my life I have always earned more money than my partner, and started my own business. But I have always supported my partner’s thoughts and encouraged her to step outside the square and give it a go if it feels right,’ one man said.

‘So I wouldn’t feel embarrassed if my partner was earning more money, l would praise her for doing so well.’

‘I think it depends on the situation. I’ve dated guys who have made less then me and it doesn’t bother me, though I was conscious of it and made sure that I considered that when making plans,’ a woman responded.

A third person said: ‘It doesn’t matter – as long as your bills get paid. I have broken it off with a guy who worked casually – it was too casual, I was scared he would ask me for a loan’.

I wouldn’t feel embarrassed if my partner was earning more money, l would praise her for doing so well,’ one man said (stock image)

Other people were adamant that times haven’t changed and most men either enjoy earning more than their partner or like to feel like they are able to provide.

‘Yes it does matter. The man needs to feel he is providing for his wife. A home, food, shelter. They are the protector. The wife’s income can go to entertainment and vacations,’ said one woman.

‘In the past, I have earned more than most men I have dated but it wasn’t fun. I tried to push them forwards and realised you can take a horse to the water, but you can’t make it drink,’ said another.

‘Now I try to date men who earn the same or more than me. I can’t respect a man who earns less. My father earned more than my mother and it’s normal to me.’

Louanne said that it didn’t make a difference to her personally who earned more in the relationship, but that both parties were contributing equally

Louanne said that it didn’t make a difference to her personally who earned more in the relationship, but that both parties were contributing equally. 

‘Contributing equally can come in other forms. I know many couples where the man looks after the children and the woman works. They contribute equally in different ways,’ she said.

‘Financial status has never been a consideration for me but as a matchmaker I hear from women frequently that the ideal partner for them needs to earn as much as or more. It seems hypergamy – or marrying someone of a superior class –  is active even in modern dating.’ 


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