Uber, Match add lobbying firms | #tinder | #pof

With Daniel Lippman

NEW BUSINESS: Uber has added Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck to its lineup of outside lobbying firms. Will Moschella will lobby on competition policy for the company, according to a disclosure filing. Uber spent $1.2 million on Washington lobbying in the first half of the year and retains eight other lobbying firms, according to disclosure filings: Ballard Partners, Capitol Tax Partners, the Doerrer Group, Forbes Tate Partners, Invariant, Mayer Brown, Peck Madigan Jones and Ulman Public Policy. The Federal Hill Group also lobbies for Uber as a subcontractor to the Doerrer Group.

The Match Group, which owns Tinder, Hinge and other dating sites, hired Mercury Strategies in June to lobby on a Senate bill that would revoke Section 230 protections for companies that host child pornography, according to newly filed disclosures. And NCTA — The Internet & Television Association has brought on Howard Symons of Jenner & Block to lobby on the same legislation as well as another bill introduced by Sens. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and John Thune (R-S.D.) that would make changes to Section 230.

TRUMP: ‘DON’T BUY GOODYEAR TIRES’: President Donald Trump lobs insults on Twitter so freely that almost nothing is shocking anymore — but his attack on Goodyear this morning was perhaps his most direct attack on an American company since taking the oath of office. “Don’t buy GOODYEAR TIRES – They announced a BAN ON MAGA HATS,” he tweeted. “Get better tires for far less!” While Trump has gone after companies such as Comcast, Amazon, General Motors and Pfizer, he hasn’t directly urged Americans to boycott Amazon or cancel their Comcast subscriptions. Goodyear, which saw its stock price slide more than 3 percent this morning before rebounding a little in the early afternoon, didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Good afternoon, and welcome to PI. Tips [email protected]. Twitter: @theodoricmeyer.

IN MEMORIAM: Former Sen. Slade Gorton (R-Wash.), who spent nearly two decades as a lobbyist at K&L Gates after losing his seat in 2000, died this morning, according to the firm. He was 92. A former Washington state attorney general, he was first elected to the Senate in 1980. He lost reelection in 1986, only to return to the Senate two years later. He signed on at Preston Gates & Ellis — which merged with another firm to form K&L Gates in 2001 — after he was defeated a second time.

— Gorton lobbied for clients including Starbucks, SpaceX and Microsoft over the years, according to disclosure filings. : “For almost twenty years, Slade’s extraordinarily keen intellect, integrity, energy, commitment to public service, and experience in all parts of the public policy process have been hugely important to our firm and clients,” Manny Rouvelas, a K&L Gates partner and a founding member of its public policy practice, said in a statement. “We all feel grateful to have worked with him.” He is survived by a sister, two brothers, three children and seven grandchildren, according to the firm. His wife, Sally, died in 2013.

ANNALS OF POTENTIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST:Doug Emhoff, whose wife, Kamala D. Harris, is to set to become the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, is taking a leave of absence from his law firm, where he has worked for an array of powerful clients, including those his boss described as ‘some of the biggest names in Hollywood,’” The Washington Post’s Michael Kranish reports. “Emhoff, 55, is an attorney at the Los Angeles office of DLA Piper, one of the world’s largest law firms.”

— “Emhoff represented ‘large domestic and international corporations and some of today’s highest profile individuals and influencers in complex business, real estate and intellectual property litigation disputes,’ the firm said on its website. ‘Doug’s influence and achievements as an insider across many spectrums has made him one of California’s go-to lawyers for several decades.’ If Emhoff returns to his job, that description would raise questions about whether any of his work would conflict with federal policy that could be influenced by Harris if she is elected vice president.”

— DLA Piper, of course, is also a Washington lobbying firm, though Emhoff isn’t registered to lobby. The firm lobbies for clients including Al Jazeera, Chipotle, Comcast, Qualcomm, Raytheon and the organizing committee for the 2028 Olympics in Los Angeles, according to disclosure filings.

IF YOU MISSED IT ON TUESDAY: Before the virus canceled Democrats’ “in-person convention, a group of donors affiliated with American Bridge 21st Century, a Democratic super PAC, had reserved a prime luxury suite at the original Milwaukee convention site,” The New York Times Shane Goldmacher reports. “The group later received a refund from the host committee of more than $500,000, according to people familiar with the matter. Now American Bridge, which had a reputation among donors for hosting some particularly blowout bashes in the past, has arranged for nightly preconvention virtual sessions, including one on Thursday with Chris Dodd, the former senator who headed [Joe] Biden’s vice-presidential search committee” and was until recently a registered lobbyist.

Balter Victory Fund (Friends of Dana Balter, New York State Democratic Committee)
For Kentucky (Amy McGrath for Senate, Inc.; Josh Hicks for Congress)

Campaign to Elect Biden-Harris (PAC)
CrushPAC (PAC)
Elect Educators Everywhere (Hybrid PAC)
End Corruption PAC (PAC)
Nu World Super PAC (PAC)
Ro Must Go PAC (Super PAC)
Save Our Future (Super PAC)
United States Constitutional Freedom Coalition (Hybrid PAC)
US Energy PAC (PAC)
Vote for Equality (Super PAC)

Adams and Reese, LLP: Deuce Drone LLC
Charles F Fuller / The Results Company, Inc.: The Bell Legal Group
Jenner & Block LLP: NCTA – The Internet & Television Association
Mercury Public Affairs, LLC: Omnia Group
Mercury Strategies, LLC: Match Group, LLC
The Rose Company, LLC: Quidnet Energy Inc.
United By Interest, LLC.: VMware, Inc.
Winning Strategies Washington: Philips North America LLC

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